International Merchandise Trade Statistics 2012

Release No: 24, 2013

2nd April, 2013  


 Provisional data put the value of goods imported in 2012 at $4,034.0 million while total export was $2,191.3

Trade2012 million.  (Refer Graph I).

Compared to 2011, imports and exports increased by $122.7 million (3.1%) and $274.9 million (14.3%) respectively.

The 2012 trade deficit amounted to $1,842.7 million compared to $1,994.9 million a year earlier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIGHLIGHTS

 

IMPORTS

 

Trade2012b

  The percentage breakdown of major import type as categorized by the Harmonized System (HS) codes is as follows;

  • 31.0 %  - Mineral products;
  • 13.3 %  - Machinery & mechanical & electrical appliances & parts thereof;
  • 9.3 %  - Live animals: animal products;
  • 5.9 %  - Vegetable products;
  • 5.9 %  - Chemicals and allied products;
  • 5.8 %  - Vehicles, aircraft, vessels & associated transport equipment

 

Compared to 2011, the import categories recording notable increases were:

  • Mineral products [HS 25-27], up $62.4 million (5.2%) to $1,251.9 million due to increased imports of gas oil (diesel), aviation turbine fuel and residual fuel oil;
  • Live animals: animal products [HS 01-05], up $48.9 million (14.9%) to $376.3 million due to increased imports of fresh fish;
  • Chemicals and allied products [HS 28-38], up $25.1 million (11.9%) to $236.6 million due to increased imports of pharmaceutical products, essential oils and resinoids, perfumery, cosmetic or toilet preparations;
  • Miscellaneous manufactured articles [HS 94-96], up $24.5 million (52.9%) to $70.9 million due to increased imports of photoflood lamps designed for cinematographic cameras and sanitary towels and napkins;
  • Base metals and articles thereof [HS 72-83], up $13.4 million (7.6%) to $189.1 million due to increased imports of iron and steel and articles of iron or steel;
  • Plastic, rubber & articles thereof [HS 39-40], up $10.6 million (6.2%) to $179.8 million due to increased imports of new pneumatic tyres of rubber and articles of plastics and;
  • Textiles and textile articles [HS 50-63], up $8.7 million (5.1%) to $177.7 million due to increased imports of textiles made up of cotton and man-made staple fibres.

 

Graph II is relevant

 

Compared to 2011, the import category recording notable decreases were:

 

  • Vehicles, aircraft, vessels & associated transport equipment [HS 86-89], down $60.5 million (20.6%) to $232.9 million due to decreased imports of aircrafts and parts thereof;
  • Pearls, precious, semi-precious stones & metals [HS 71], down $10.8 million (27.4%) to $28.6 million due to decreased imports of jewelry and parts thereof and;
  • Machinery & mechanical & electrical appliances & parts thereof [HS 84-85], down $7.2 million (1.3%) to $537.3 million due to decreased imports of electrical machinery and equipment and parts thereof.

 

Trade2012c

For the year 2012, Fiji’s major sources of imports (Refer Graph III) were:

  

  • Singapore, up $78.7 million (6.5%) to $1,284.0 million due to increased imports of light oils & preparations, aviation turbine fuel, gas oil (diesel) and residual fuel oil;
  • Australia, down $28.2 million (3.7%) to $738.1 million due to decreased imports of milk and cream, margarine and articles of jewellery and parts thereof;
  • New, up $21.0 million (3.9%) to $559.0 million due to increased imports of  iron and steel, aluminium and articles thereof, articles of iron or steel and sanitary towels and napkins for babies;
  • China–People’s Republic, up $31.0 million (9.6%) to $355.5 million due to increased imports of fresh fish, garlic, new pneumatic tyres, of rubber and telephones for cellular networks or wireless networks and; 
  • United States of America, down $75.5 million (38.2%) to $122.4 million due to decreased imports of aircrafts and parts thereof.

 

DOMESTIC EXPORTS

 

 Trade2012d

 

 The percentage breakdown of major Export type as categorized by the HS codes is as follows;

  

  • 43.3 % - Prepared foodstuffs, beverages, spirits & tobacco;
  • 13.9 % - Pearls, precious, semi precious stones & metals;
  • 9.7 % - Textiles and textile articles;
  • 7.5 % - Vegetable products;
  • 6.6 % - Wood, cork & articles thereof & plaiting materials;
  • 5.9 % - Live animals: animal products.

   

For the year 2012, Fiji’s major domestic export   destinations (Refer Graph V) were:

 

  • Trade2012eAustralia, down $5.4 million (1.8%) to $289.9 million due to decreased exports of gold;
  • United States of America, up $15.5 million (9.3%) to $183.1 million due to increased exports of mineral water;
  • United Kingdom, up $38.4 million (27.1%) to $180.0 million due to increased exports of sugar;
  • New Zealand, down $9.2 million (11.4%) to $71.0 million due to decreased exports of taro and molasses and;
  • Japan, down $8.1 million (18.3%) to $36.3 million due to decreased exports of fresh fish and woodchips.

 

 



 

PRINCIPAL DOMESTIC EXPORT COMMODITIES

 

Trade2012f

 

Performance of Fiji’s principal domestic export commodities given in Table 6 for the year 2012 shows a growth in the exports of (Refer Graph VI):

 

  • Ginger by 85.0 per cent;
  • Textiles, yarn, fabrics & made up articles by 37.7 per cent;
  • Sugar by 37.4 per cent;
  • Mineral water by 26.0 per cent;
  • Coral & similar materials by 11.1 per cent;
  • Timber, cork and wood by 11.1 per cent;
  • Corned beef by 5.9 per cent;
  • Sweet biscuits by 5.0 per cent;
  • Flour by 2.8 per cent and;
  • Kava by 2.6 per cent. 

Decreases were recorded in the exports of:  

  • Fish by 39.2 per cent;
  • Copra by 34.5 per cent;
  • Folding cartons, boxes and cases by 20.9 per cent;
  • Footwear and headgear by 20.6 per cent;
  • Fruits and vegetables by 11.7 per cent;
  • Molasses by 8.4 per cent;
  • Gold by 4.3 per cent;
  • Coconut oil by 2.1 per cent;
  • Garments by 1.3 per cent and;
  • Uncooked pasta by 0.8 per cent.

 

RE-EXPORTS

Re-exports totaled $1,146.1 million compared to $908.4 million in 2011.  Petroleum products sold to visiting ships, aircrafts and to the neighboring Pacific Island Countries earned $607.3 million.

 

FIJI’S TRADE WITH ITS MAJOR TRADING PARTNERS

 

Surpluses were recorded with:

  • Cook Islands, up $2.8 million (92.1%) to $33.8 million;
  • French Polynesia, up $0.6 million (68.5%) to $9.1 million;
  • Japan, up $1.3 million (35.2%) to $39.4 million;
  • Kiribati, up $8.6 (222.6) to $47.4 million;
  • New Caledonia, up $8.0 million (867.4%) to $17.3 million;
  • Papua New Guinea, up $36.8 million (1,139.1%) to $69.2 million;
  • Samoa, down $2.1 million (54.6%) to $36.6 million;
  • Solomon Islands, up $4.2 million (312.0%) to $17.8 million;
  • Tonga, down $5.1 million (49.3%) to $97.9 million;
  • Tuvalu, down $2.6 million (148.6%) to $14.8 million;
  • United Kingdom, up $42.8 million (365.9%) to $160.3 million;
  • United States of America, up $118.1 million (9,032.3%) to $104.9 million;
  • Vanuatu, up $4.2 million (130.6%) to $36.1 million and;
  • Wallis & Futuna, up $1.2 million (52.5%) to $24.8 million.

 

Deficits were recorded with:

  • Australia, up $10.4 million (24.8%) to $407.5 million;
  • China-People’s Republic, up $24.8 million (79.9%) to $286.9 million;
  • China-Taiwan, up $4.4 million (158.8 %) to $23.5 million;
  • France, down $4.2 million (370.4%) to $15.7 million;
  • Germany-Federal Republic, down $1.6 million  (151.5%) to $12.1 million;
  • Hong Kong, down $19.4 million (578.7%) to $53.0 million;
  • India, down $3.1 million (54.6%) to $60.0 million;
  • Indonesia, down $7.9 million (283.0%) to $35.7 million;
  • Korea-Republic of, down $0.5 million (12.7%) to $36.9 million;
  • Malaysia, down $8.7 million  (115.5%) to $84.7 million;
  • New Zealand, down $33.1 million (77.9%) to $459.7 million;
  • Singapore, down $73.1 million (61.5%) to $1,264.9 million;
  • Thailand, up $18.8 million (215.8%) to $68.5 million and;
  • Vietnam, up $1.4 million (50.1%) to $25.7 million.

 

For more information or further enquiries please contact Mrs. Olivia Koroi on 3315822, Ext 123.

The International Merchandise Trade Statistics for January 2013 will be released in April.

 

 

E. Waqavonovono

Government Statistician