INTERNATIONAL MERCHANDISE TRADE STATISTICS - 2016

FBoS Release No: 22, 2017 8th May 2017

31st May 2016


imtsDec16aProvisional data put the value of goods imported in 2016 at $4,839.2 million while the value of total exports was $1,936.6 million. (Refer Graph I).

Compared to 2015, imports increased by $82.4 million (1.7%) while total exports decreased by $122.6 million (6.0%).

The 2016 international merchandise trade deficit amounted to $2,902.6 million compared to $2,697.6 million a year earlier (2015).

 

 

 

HIGHLIGHTS

IMPORTS

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The percentage breakdown of major import types as categorized by the Harmonized System (HS) codes are as follows;

Table 1: Major contributors to Imports FJD [Millions]

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Compared to 2015, the import categories recording notable increases were:

  • Machinery & mechanical & electrical appliances & parts thereof [HS 84-85], up $100.7 million (12.8%) to $889.3 million due to increased imports of other dish washing machines of the household type;
  • Vehicles, aircraft & associated transport equipment [HS 86-89], up $81.1 million (16.2 %) to $580.8 million due to increased imports of used or reconditioned passenger motor cars;
  • Base metals & articles thereof [HS 72-83], up $45.8 million (15.9%) to $333.7 million due to increased imports barbed wire of iron or steel;
  • Plastic, rubber & articles thereof [HS 39-40], up $32.6 million (14.0%) to $266.0 million due to increased imports of new pneumatic tyres;
  • Wood, cork & articles thereof & plaiting materials [HS 44-46], up $31.1 million (134.4%) to $54.2 million due to increased imports of other articles of wood;
  • Chemicals and allied products [HS 28-38], up $20.0 million (7.5%) to $286.7 million due to increased imports of pharmaceutical products;
  • Miscellaneous manufactured articles [HS 94-96], up $17.6 million (14.5%) to $138.6 million due to increased imports of LED lights;
  • Photographic & optical, medical & surgical goods & clocks/watches & musical instruments [HS 90-92], up $16.7 million (22.2%) to $91.6 million due to increased imports of other sunglasses;
  • Prepared foodstuffs, beverages, spirits & tobacco [HS 16-24], up $11.2 million (4.9%) to $242.4 million due to increased imports of alcohol;
  • Wood pulp, paper & paperboard & articles thereof [HS 47-49], up $8.9 million (6.9%) to $137.9 million due to increased imports of other printing paper and photocopying paper;
  • Articles of stone, plaster cement, glass & ceramic products [HS 68-70], up $7.3 million (12.9%) to $64.1 million due to increased imports of tiles, cubes and similar articles; and
  • Pearls, precious, semi-precious stones & metals [HS 71], up $6.6 million (30.0%) to $28.8 million due to increased imports of inlaid with or incorporating pearls, precious or semi-precious stones.

Compared to 2015, the import categories recording notable decreases were:

  • Mineral products [HS 25-27], down $272.0 million (26.2%) to $765.8 million due to decreased imports of gas oil (diesel);
  • Live animals: animal products [HS 01-05], down $24.8 million (7.2%) to $321.1 million due to decreased imports of fresh fish;
  • Animal or vegetable oils & fats [HS 15], down $6.3 million (9.9%) to $57.0 million due to decreased imports of imitation lard, liquid margarine and shortenings, vegetable oils and fats; and
  • Textiles and textile articles [HS 50-63], down $5.8 million (2.4%) to $233.9 million due to decreased imports of garments.

imtsDec16dFor the year 2016, Fiji’s major sources of imports (Refer Graph III) were:

  • New Zealand, up $124.4 million (17.3%) to $843.0 million due to increased imports of potatoes;
  • Australia, up $73.9 million (9.6%) to $840.2 million due to increased imports of lamb;
  • Singapore, down $109.1 million (12.8%) to $743.8 million due to decreased imports of gas oil (diesel);
  • * China - People’s Republic, up $46.1 million (6.6%) to $741.9 million due to increased imports of canned fish; and
  • Japan, up $122.0 million (58.1%) to $332.1 million due to increased imports of vehicles.

 

 

 

 

 

* Imports of fresh fish from China – People’s Republic refer to fish caught outside Fiji’s EEZ (High seas) by fishing vessels identified according to the country of registration.

Import trade with other countries were:

  • China-Taiwan, up $4.9 million (5.6%) to $92.9 million due to increased imports of fresh fish;
  • Cook Islands, up $0.3 million (1,002.9%) to $0.4 million due to increased imports of tanks, casks, drums, cans boxes and similar container for any materials other than compressed or liquefied gas of iron or steel;
  • France, up $22.2 million (91.2%) to $46.6 million due to increased imports of other parts for dish washing machine;
  • French Polynesia, up $0.04 million (87.0%) to $0.1 million due to increased imports of other articles of fibers;
  • Germany, Federal Republic, down $0.5 million (2.3%) to $20.7 million due to decreased imports of boards, panels consoles, desk, cabinets and other bases equipped with two or more apparatus;
  • Hong Kong, up $8.6 million (7.3%) to $126.8 million due to increased imports of frozen fish excluding fish fillets;
  • India, up $0.6 million (0.5%) to $107.2 million due to increased imports of pharmaceutical products;
  • Indonesia, up $8.0 million (18.5%) to $51.5 million due to increased imports of sweet biscuits;
  • Kiribati, down $0.1 million (4.8%) to $1.4 million due to decreased imports of other tunas;
  • Korea, Republic of, down $126.1 million (43.6%) to $163.0 million due to decreased imports of gas oil (diesel);
  • Malaysia, up $4.6 million (4.2%) to $114.6 million due to increased imports of soya bean oil and its factions;
  • New Caledonia, up $0.2 million (46.5%) to $0.5 million due to increased imports of lubricating oil;
  • Papua New Guinea, up $1.4 million (15.5%) to $10.6 million due to increased imports of textile materials;
  • Samoa, down $0.6 million (63.9%) to $0.3 million due to decreased imports of personal and household effects;
  • Solomon Islands, down $0.8 million (13.7%) to $4.9 million due to decreased imports of canned fish;
  • Thailand, down $4.9 million (3.7%) to $125.5 million due to decreased imports of sugar;
  • Tonga, down $0.2 million (50.2%) to $0.2 million due to decreased imports of kava;
  • Tuvalu, down $0.3 million (81.6%) to $0.1 million due to decreased imports of fresh fish;
  • United Kingdom, up $8.8 million (26.4%) to $42.0 million due to increased imports of whiskies;
  • United States, down $3.6 million (2.6%) to $134.5 million due to decreased imports of pharmaceutical products;
  • Vanuatu, down $0.6 million (10.2%) to $5.0 million due to decreased imports of fresh fish;
  • Vietnam, up $4.3 million (12.8%) to $37.8 million due to increased imports of semi-milled or wholly milled rice; and
  • Wallis & Futuna, up $0.02 million (200.0%) to $0.04 million due to increased imports of other textile materials.

PRINCIPAL IMPORT COMMODITIES

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Performance of Fiji’s principal import commodities given in Table 10 for the year 2016 shows growth in the imports of (Refer Graph IV):

  • Vehicles, aircraft & associated transport equipment by 39.4 percent;
  • Base metals & articles thereof by 15.9 percent;
  • Plastic, rubber & articles thereof by 14.0 percent;
  • Machinery & mechanical & electrical appliances & parts thereof by 12.8 percent;
  • Chemicals and allied products by 7.5 percent;
  • Wood pulp, paper & paperboard & articles thereof by 6.9 percent;
  • Prepared foodstuffs, beverages, spirits & tobacco by 4.9 percent; and
  • Vegetable products by 1.2 percent.

Decreases were recorded in the imports of:

  • Mineral products by 26.2 percent;
  • Live animals: animal products by 7.2 percent; and
  • Textiles and textile articles by 2.4 percent.

DOMESTIC EXPORTS

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The percentage breakdown of major domestic export types as categorized by the Harmonized System (HS) codes are as follows;

Table 2: Major contributors to Domestic Exports FJD [Millions]

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Compared to 2015, the domestic export categories recording notable increases were:

  • Pearls, precious, semi-precious stones & metals [HS 71], up $24.5 million (23.4%) to $129.3 million due to increased domestic exports of gold;
  • Live animals: animal products [HS 01-05], up $20.5 million (22.0%) to $113.6 million due to increased domestic exports of fresh fish; and
  • Machinery & mechanical & electrical appliances & parts there of [HS 84-85], up $11.0 million (69.5%) to $26.9 million due to increased domestic exports of lead acid of a kind used for starting piston engines.

Compared to 2015, the domestic export categories recording notable decreases were:

  • Prepared foodstuffs, beverages, spirits & tobacco [HS 16-24], down $52.7 million (10.5%) to $446.7 million due to decreased domestic exports of sugar;
  • Wood, cork & articles thereof & plaiting materials [HS 44-46], down $29.2 million (31.4%) to $63.9 million due to decreased domestic exports of woodchips; and
  • Textiles & textile articles [HS 50-63], down $7.9 million (6.8%) to $109.0 million due to decreased domestic exports of garments.

imtsDec16hFor the year 2016, Fiji’s major domestic export destinations (Refer Graph VI) were:

  • United States of America, down $31.8 million (9.9%) to $288.1 million due to decreased exports of molasses;
  • Australia, up $9.4 million (3.8%) to $259.3 million due to increased exports of gold;
  • United Kingdom, down $32.6 million (31.6%) to $70.6 million due to decreased exports of sugar;
  • New Zealand, up $3.1 million (4.9%) to $65.5 million due to increased exports of dalo; and
  • Vanuatu, up $7.6 million (15.5%) to $56.7 million due to increased exports of pasta.

 

 

 

 


Other major domestic export destinations were:

  • China – People’s Republic, down $7.0 million (14.9%) to $40.0 million due to decreased exports of fresh fish;
  • China-Taiwan, up $11.3 million (189.0%) to $17.2 million due to increased exports of fresh fish;
  • Cook Islands, down $0.4 million (11.8%) to $3.1 million due to decreased exports of uncooked pasta;
  • France, up $0.02 million (5.9%) to $0.4 million due to increased exports of personal and household effects;
  • French Polynesia, up $0.9 million (13.3%) to $7.8 million due to increased exports of flour;
  • Germany, Federal Republic, down $0.2 million (5.8%) to $3.3 million due to decreased exports of ginger;
  • Hong Kong, up $1.6 million (6.6%) to $26.4 million due to increased exports of fresh fish;
  • India, up $0.7 million (130.9%) to $1.2 million due to increased exports of personal and household effects;
  • Indonesia, up $0.2 million (14.0%) to $1.2 million due to increased exports of mineral water;
  • Japan, down $8.9 million (22.1%) to $31.5 million due to decreased exports of woodchips;
  • Kiribati, down $3.4 million (13.1%) to $22.6 million due to decreased exports of kava;
  • Korea, Republic of, down $1.0 million (26.0%) to $2.8 million due to decreased exports of copper waste and scrap;
  • Malaysia, down $1.4 million (43.1%) to $1.9 million due to decreased exports of crude, soya bean oil;
  • New Caledonia, down $0.8 million (15.5%) to $4.3 million due to decreased exports of cartons, boxes and cases;
  • Papua New Guinea, down $3.9 million (17.6%) to $18.4 million due to decreased exports of flour;
  • Samoa, up $8.6 million (32.6%) to $34.9 million due to increased exports of other portland cement;
  • Singapore, up $0.5 million (14.4%) to $3.6 million due to increased exports of mineral water;
  • Solomon Islands, up $6.2 million (47.1%) to $19.5 million due to increased exports of sweet biscuits;
  • Thailand, up $1.7 million (126.0%) to $3.0 million due to increased exports of fresh fish;
  • Tonga, up $0.7 million (2.8%) to $26.3 million due to increased exports of sweet biscuits;
  • Tuvalu, down $2.8 million (25.3%) to $8.2 million due to decreased exports of flour;
  • Vietnam, up $2.8 million (92.5%) to $5.7 million due to increased exports of fresh fish; and
  • Wallis & Futuna, up $1.0 million (12.7%) to $8.8 million due to increased exports of kava.

PRINCIPAL DOMESTIC EXPORT COMMODITIES

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Performance of Fiji’s principal domestic export commodities given in Table 9 for the year 2016 shows a growth in the exports of (Refer Graph VII):

  • Coconut oil by 65.1 percent;
  • Kava by 60.8 percent;
  • Gold by 30.1 percent;
  • Footwear and headgear by 16.6 percent;
  • Mineral water by 7.3 percent;
  • Uncooked pasta by 2.0 percent;
  • Fruits and vegetables by 1.0 percent; and
  • Textiles, yarn & made up articles by 0.6 percent.

Decreases were recorded in the exports of:

  • Molasses by 69.9 percent;
  • Folding cartons, boxes and cases by 41.9 percent;
  • Coral & similar materials by 41.2 percent;
  • Ginger by 32.2 percent;
  • Timber, cork & wood by 31.4 percent;
  • Sweet biscuits by 26.0 percent;
  • Sugar by 20.4 percent;
  • Corned meat of bovine animals by 14.0 percent;
  • Garments by 7.2 percent;
  • Flour by 5.1 percent; and
  • Fish by 2.5 percent.

RE-EXPORTS

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The percentage breakdowns of major re-export types as categories by the Harmonized System (HS) codes are as follows;

Table 3: Major contributors to Re-exports FJD [Millions]

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Compared to 2015, the re-export categories recording notable increases were:

  • Machinery & mechanical & electrical appliances & parts thereof [HS 84-85], up $54.9 million (141.1%) to $93.8 million due to increased re-exports of television cameras, video cameras and digital cameras; and
  • Photographic & optical, medical & surgical goods & clocks/watches & musical instruments [HS 90-92], up $18.2 million (388.0%) to $22.9 million due to increased re-exports of parts and accessories of photographic surveying.

Compared to 2015, the re-export categories recording notable decreases were:

  • Live animals: animal products [HS 01-05], down $82.3 million (33.8%) to $160.9 million due to decreased re-exports of fresh fish;
  • Mineral products [HS 25–27], down $71.1 million (16.6%) to $356.4 million due to decreased re-exports of gas oil (diesel); and
  • Vehicles, aircraft & associated transport equipment [HS 86–89], down $15.5 million (30.5%) to $35.4 million due to decreased re-exports of aircraft.

imtsDec16lFor the year 2016, Fiji’s major re-export destinations (Refer Graph IX) were:

  • New Zealand, up $29.3 million (71.4%) to $70.4 million due to increased re-exports of container for compressed or liquefied gas of iron or steel;
  • United States of America, up $39.9 million (198.5%) to $59.9 million due to increased re-exports of television cameras, digital cameras and video cameras;
  • China - People’s Republic, down $0.8 million (1.3%) to $59.5 million due to decreased re-exports of fresh fish;
  • Tonga, down $20.0 million (26.6%) to $55.3 million due to decreased re-exports of gas oil (diesel); and
  • Kiribati, down $11.4 million (21.0%) to $43.0 million due to decreased re-exports of gas oil (diesel).

 

 

 

 

FIJI’S TRADE WITH ITS MAJOR TRADING PARTNERS

Surpluses were recorded with:

  • United Kingdom, down $39.9 million (56.5%) to $30.7 million;
  • Tuvalu, down $4.6 million (19.6%) to $18.7 million;
  • United States of America, up $11.7 million (5.8%) to $213.6 million;
  • Papua New Guinea, down $0.7 million (2.8%) to $25.1 million;
  • Cook Islands, down $4.3 million (16.6%) to $21.3 million;
  • Kiribati, down $14.8 million (18.7%) to $64.2 million;
  • Samoa, up $4.2 million (9.8%) to $47.0 million;
  • New Caledonia, down $10.6 million (61.0%) to $6.8 million;
  • Tonga, down $19.0 million (19.0%) to $81.4 million;
  • Wallis & Futuna, down $1.6 million (7.4%) to $19.9 million;
  • Vanuatu, up $19.7 million (34.9%) to $76.2 million;
  • Solomon Islands, up $3.7 million (23.8%) to $19.4 million; and
  • French Polynesia, down $11.9 million (57.9%) to $8.6 million.

Deficits were recorded with:

  • France, up $21.8 million (92.7%) to $45.4 million;
  • Singapore, down $109.6 million (13.0%) to $733.6 million;
  • Malaysia, up $15.5 million (16.1%) to $112.3 million;
  • New Zealand, up $92.0 million (15.0%) to $707.0 million;
  • China-People’s Republic, up $53.9 million (9.2 %) to $642.4 million;
  • Thailand, down $11.8 million (9.4%) to $113.8 million;
  • Australia, up $79.5 million (16.9%) to $549.7 million;
  • Korea, Republic of, down $124.8 million (44.2%) to $157.8 million;
  • Hong Kong, down $13.4 million (16.6%) to $94.2 million;
  • India, down $0.7 million (0.7%) to $105.2 million;
  • Indonesia, up $7.9 million (18.8%) to $49.9 million;
  • Germany, Federal Republic, down $0.6 million (3.2%) to $17.1 million;
  • China -Taiwan, down $3.2 million (4.4%) to $67.8 million; and
  • Japan, up $197.4 million (264.9%) to $272.0 million.

Below presents the main features of Fiji’s International Merchandise Trade Statistics for the Year 2016.

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For further enquiries please contact Mrs. Veenita Miller on email: or telephone 331 5822 (ext. 386 241) or direct line 323 0841.

The International Merchandise Trade Statistics for January 2017 will be released in April 2017.